Published On : Fri, Mar 11th, 2016

Here comes world’s thinnest lens 2000 times thinner than human hair!

thin-lenses-zeiss-1.9-1-300x200

How thin can you imagine a lens could be, when compared to a single trend of your hair? Well most of you will answer that a lens may always be thicker hair, but hold on and get ready to be surprised!!! Here comes a lens which is not only thinner than hair but its the world’s thinnest ever lens and guess what? It is 2000 times thinner than human hair, which is a breakthrough set to revolutionise nanotechnology.

The finished lens is 6.3 nanometres in size as compared to the previous smallest lens which was 50 nanometres thick.
According to ABC News, the lens has been created by a team of researchers led by Yuerui ‘Larry’ Lu from Australian National University (ANU).

Scientists said the lens could have revolutionary applications in medicine, science and technology and the it could be used to create bendable computer screens.

While the the new lens has already been experimented by technology companies with prototype TV and computer screens that can be rolled up or folded, the mass production at cheaper price is yet to be devised.

“This type of material is the perfect candidate for future flexible displays,” Lu said.

Another application of the Australian-made lens could be arrays of micro-lenses that mimic the compound eyes of insects.

Lu who led the Nano-Electro-Mechanical System (NEMS) Laboratory in ANU Research School of Engineering, said a crystal called molybdenum disulphide was the special ingredient.

Researchers shaved off layers of the crystal atom by atom in a bid to create an object with the domed shape of a lens and the delicate operation used an ion beam, something commonly used in electronics manufacturing.

At one stage in the process, scientists used sticky tape to peel off a sliver of crystal from which they crafted the final product.

Lu said manipulating the flow of light at an atomic scale could lead to unprecedented miniaturisation in the making of cameras.